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SONG PREMIERE: Death Doula offers dreamy indie-rock reflections on “Dory Joins Alfred”

SONG PREMIERE: Death Doula offers dreamy indie-rock reflections on “Dory Joins Alfred”
SONG PREMIERE: Death Doula offers dreamy indie-rock reflections on “Dory Joins Alfred”

Love Spells is the debut album from Death Doula, a dark art rock band from Portland, Oregon. The new album was recorded at Jackpot Studios by Adam Lee (Built to Spill, Sleater-Kinney) and mixed by Bob Cheek (Deftones, Band of Horses). It will be released for digital download and streaming via Death Doula Records on September 20th.

Kerry Jones was in love with his best friend. Kyle List didn’t mind, he asked her to work with him in his small home studio. By the end of the night they were in love and had made a demo of “Disembark”, which would become the first single from Love SpellsThree weeks later, he moved to Portland to live with her, with no plan other than the intuition that the music would take them somewhere.

Two years later, they recruited the veteran rhythm section of Keith Vidal on bass (Marjorie Faire, Nyles Lannon) and Adam Kozie on drums (Pollens, Crystal Beth) and adopted the name “Death Doula.” The music they created showcases their shared love of artists such as Can, Television, Jeff Buckley, The Cranberries, Deerhunter, Kate Bush, The Sundays and Deftones, while remaining sonically fresh.

Today To slide is the premiere of Death Doula’s latest single “Dory Joins Alfred,” a haunting work of dreamy indie rock that grapples with a dying grandmother and deeply reflects on what a life well-lived looks like two generations ago. Kerry Jones sings in a way that balances soulful pop with rocker cool, while the band conjures atmospheric instrumentals behind her. The result is a song that’s haunting and dark, yet manages to soar with its full sound and swelling energy.

Impossible to fully understand, my maternal grandmother was a young girl during the Great Depression, had three children and four grandchildren who adored her, and a loving husband of almost 70 years who danced with her until he died. I suffered from dementia for several years after Alfred died and slowly declined until Dory’s own death, I have spent years reminiscing about fond memories and longing for the Nana I once knew to return. So many in our generation are dealing with similar experiences with their elderly loved ones as dementia becomes more common. Where do they go, though their bodies remain? –Kerry Jones

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